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20100917
20100917
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> jennifer, remind our audience again of the lyrics to this cheer that you found so offensive and the first time that you heard it. >> the first time i heard it was a few weeks ago after my daughter came home from practice and she told me one of the cheers and the lyrics are, our back's fake, we shake our booties from left to right. at that point i was just kind of in shock and right away, the next day i addressed it with the coach and the general manager of the wolverines. >> what did they say to you. >> at that time the general manager was kind of like, well, we have been doing it they way for years. the coach said she really doesn't have any power, she would take it to the general manager, she would like me to address it with the general manager, but since she doesn't have any of the power, we'll see what they say. they came back the following day and at that time, she said, you know, they have been doing it that way for 20 years t board is aware, so you can either have your daughter sit out or that's it. now, she also told me that the cheers were mandated at that time by the association
they are in custody. their next court date is september 23. in san bruno, jennifer mistrot, cbs 5. >>> those devastated by the explosion are now sifting through the burned-out rubble. their homes, their treasured keepsakes, wiped out in a tragic instant. but while there is little left to salvage, anne makovec shows us from these ashes hope emerges. >> reporter: it's not worth saving but we did anyway. >>> reporter: the only decipherable items left over from their three-bedroom home now fit in this box. >> like there are baseball cards in here and so i don't know why we took this. but we did. or an old yearbook, something like that. >> reporter: one week after the gas explosion decimated their neighborhood, the family suited up in hazmat gear to sift through the rubble that was once their home on glenview drive. >> it's like --it's kind of like going to, i don't know, a cemetery. just everything was dead, you know? no life left to it. >> reporter: what was that life, -- what was that like, the digging through rubble? >> it kind of felt like, you know, i don't know, like you weren't going to a
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)